Windpower!

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1.    Will a Windpower generator supply enough power for my house?

2.    Do I just plug in a wind generator to my house?

3.    How fast do the blades turn?

4.    What stops the blades from overreving in high winds?

5.    Will a Windpower generator power my well pump?

6.    Can I use a higher output alternator">

Windpower!

Frequently
Asked
Questions
(FAQ)

(home)


Click on question to find answer

1.    Will a Windpower generator supply enough power for my house?

2.    Do I just plug in a wind generator to my house?

3.    How fast do the blades turn?

4.    What stops the blades from overreving in high winds?

5.    Will a Windpower generator power my well pump?

6.    Can I use a higher output alternator, or add another alternator?

7.    Can I make the blades bigger to get more power?

8.    Can I add more Windpower generators to get more power?

9.      How do I hook up the electrical wiring to the alternator?

 

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We no longer sell complete units as they are basically homebuilt with an automotive alternator making mass production unfeasible. A good handyman with basic mechanical skills and minor welding experience would have no problem building and maintaining this unit. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.    Answer:     Probably not. The Windpower generator produces a consistent 500 watts in a 20 mph wind. The average American house has a 24000 watt electrical service. That is because in your new modern home you don't want to be burdened by worrying about turning on lights, appliances, washing machines, well pumps, etc, all at once, and overloading your electrical capacity. So, for convenience, building codes require the higher capacity electrical service. For remote cabins, or emergency  purpose, you could get by with a much lower electrical capacity by exercising a little conservation.
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2.    Answer:    No. A Windpower generator produces 12 volts DC. Your house wiring is probably 120/240 volt AC. After installation of the Windpower generator on its mounting pole, you need to connect it to storage batteries. Then,  connect that to a new 12 volt circuit and/or wire it through a power inverter to get a usable 120 volts AC that you can install through a transfer switch to your house. This may require the work of a qualified electrician before you have usable power in your house. Much more detailed instructions and helpful tips are included in the package.  
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3.    Answer:    Because of the physical construction of the blade assembly, and it's massive diameter of 6', it does not seem to exceed 350 rpm's, even in severe winds of 50+ mph.                                                     

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4.    Answer:    Because of the physical construction of the blade assembly, and it's massive diameter of 6', the shaft does not seem to exceed 350 rpm's. The outer edges of the blade assembly are very rough.
For that reason, the aerodynamic drag at high speeds seem to restrict overreving. Here are some mathematical calculations that indicate that a shaft speed of 350 rpms will produce alternator speed of 1750 rpms, and the outer edges of the blade assembly will be rushing through the air at 75 mph!    

(click here for math calculations)

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5.    Answer:    Yes, it may, if you have a shallow well jet pump. You can tell this if your well is under 100 feet deep and the pump motor is located above ground. Look at the motor and see if it is 1/2 or 3/4 hp and can be wired to operate on 120 volts. If so, you need a minimum of a 1000 watt inverter to operate it.
If you have a deep well, over 100 feet deep, and your well pump motor is submersible (at the bottom of the well) it may not be practical to operate it from an inverter. These pump motors are typically 2 or 3 hp or more  and can operate on 240 volts only. In both cases, it may be more practical to use 240 volts from your electrical service, or a generator, and operate the pump only on occasion to fill a large storage tank on a daily or weekly basis and use a 12 volt pump to pressurize and distribute water to your house.     
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6.    Answer:    No. The match of the blades and alternator seem to be the best according to trial and error. If you increase the load, the unit will not start or even reach maximum rpms during windy conditions, unless you increase the blade diameter. Then the load on the pole increases and you must resize it to accommodate. You end up with a larger and larger installation like the industrial units that are now in operation at a prohibited cost. If you increase the generator load, you must increase the rotor diameter, and then the blade engineering must be refined, and the shaft loads must be increased, then the tower load must be increased, on and on.
The Windpower wind generator has been tried and tested so that all components will work together under all conditions.
A 6' rotor built per specifications, will turn a 3/4" shaft at no more than 350 rpms. That is enough to turn a 60 amp GM alternator 1750 rpms and produce a steady 500 watts. All the above mounted on a 2-1/2" pipe as specified in the plans will not need guy wires for support.
This unit, connected to a bank of 3 or 4 deep cycle batteries and hooked to a 1000 watt inverter will provide enough power for lights, TVs , computers, well pumps, etc, etc. But maybe not all at once!

 If more power is desired, simply add another Windpower unit. Maintenance will also be much easier if you keep it simple. 

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7.    Answer:    No. Bigger blades will require more fine tuning and balancing to get them to turn at the high speeds that are needed. It will also require a larger shaft and bearings. If you want to keep this a small, easy to maintain unit, do not exceed the 6' diameter rotor.  

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8.    Answer:    Yes.  The easiest way is to start out with one Windpower generator built to specifications, then as your needs increase, build and install another unit and add batteries until your needs are met.

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